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Art crime is huge business. Estimated to be worth between $1.5 – $6bn (£1- £4bn) annually, it is now the fourth largest international crime, after drug dealing, gun running and money laundering!!

A very famous FBI art-  retrieval expert :  Special Agent Robert “Bob” Wittman has just retired.

For nearly two decades, usually masquerading as a crooked art dealer with links to the Mafia or the Colombian drug cartels, he has run undercover sting operations, luring criminals into selling him stolen works of art.

In one famous operation,one operation he found himself ” in a hotel bathroom in Copenhagen hugging a Rembrandt to his chest as a Danish Swat (Special Weapons and Tactics) team burst into the room to arrest an Iraqi-born hoodlum named Baha Kadhoum” , who was trying to sell to him Rembrandt’s self-portrait from 1630- worth Millions.

Even in retirement, this agent wont allowhis face to be photographed, for risk of reprisals..

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See the bottom for a wikipedia definition. But essentially, its a print. Nowadays its tended to mean a Fine Art print of a painting, onto a canvas- so the print looks like a painting.

Its a great piece of technology with some good uses- but I personally am not a big fan.

I only like hand-painted art, as I think Giclee is a bit of a cheat! But that’s only my opinion…. what’s yours? At Portrait Xpress artists, all the art is done 100% by hand. Sure, its copied from people’s photo’s (thats the only way that you can get a painting made for USD 100 and it enables someone in Alabama to paint someone’s portrait in  Yorkshire) but it’s still 100% hand painted.

What do you think of Giclee? is it good or bad? The useful thing about it is that Fine Art prints all can be printed to the same standard, which ensures easy quality control I guess.

Well, Wikipedia can tell you that Giclée (pronounced [ʒiːˈkleɪ] “zhee-clay” or /dʒiːˈkleɪ, from FrenchIPA: [ʒiˈkle]), is an invented name (i.e. a neologism) for the process of making fine art prints from a digitalink-jet printing. The word “giclée” is derived from the French language word “le gicleur” meaning “nozzle”, or more specifically “gicler” meaning “to squirt, spurt, or spray”[1]. It was coined by Jack Duganne, a printmaker working in the field, to represent any inkjet-based digital print used as fine art. The intent of that name was to distinguish commonly known industrial “Iris proofs” from the type of fine art prints artists were producing on those same types of printers. The name was originally applied to fine art prints created on Iris printers in a process invented in the early 1990s but has since come to mean any high quality ink-jet print and is often used in galleries and print shops to denote such prints.

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