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Here are some pet paintings (original photo’s then final paintings) by Portrait Xpress artists. Certainly the original photo’s are good… but you can see that the Paintings make a great gift/ memory! And the beauty of paintings rather than prints, is that so many alterations can be made, up to the person who comissions the artwork.

original photo  (labrador puppy)

original photo

original photo

final painting

final painting

final painting

another photo

original photo

original photo

and the painting

the finished painting!

the finished painting!

see my previous post for a video of one of these being painted, to show you its 100% by hand, no printing or any funny business!!

Have a great day.

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See the bottom for a wikipedia definition. But essentially, its a print. Nowadays its tended to mean a Fine Art print of a painting, onto a canvas- so the print looks like a painting.

Its a great piece of technology with some good uses- but I personally am not a big fan.

I only like hand-painted art, as I think Giclee is a bit of a cheat! But that’s only my opinion…. what’s yours? At Portrait Xpress artists, all the art is done 100% by hand. Sure, its copied from people’s photo’s (thats the only way that you can get a painting made for USD 100 and it enables someone in Alabama to paint someone’s portrait in  Yorkshire) but it’s still 100% hand painted.

What do you think of Giclee? is it good or bad? The useful thing about it is that Fine Art prints all can be printed to the same standard, which ensures easy quality control I guess.

Well, Wikipedia can tell you that Giclée (pronounced [ʒiːˈkleɪ] “zhee-clay” or /dʒiːˈkleɪ, from FrenchIPA: [ʒiˈkle]), is an invented name (i.e. a neologism) for the process of making fine art prints from a digitalink-jet printing. The word “giclée” is derived from the French language word “le gicleur” meaning “nozzle”, or more specifically “gicler” meaning “to squirt, spurt, or spray”[1]. It was coined by Jack Duganne, a printmaker working in the field, to represent any inkjet-based digital print used as fine art. The intent of that name was to distinguish commonly known industrial “Iris proofs” from the type of fine art prints artists were producing on those same types of printers. The name was originally applied to fine art prints created on Iris printers in a process invented in the early 1990s but has since come to mean any high quality ink-jet print and is often used in galleries and print shops to denote such prints.

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